The Doodle Cross

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A few years ago I did some doodle drawings using one continuous line to create patterns. A doodle, by definition, is to scribble aimlessly. There was something about the flow of the lines that an idea began to evolve. The doodle is a lot like life. It curves, turns, overlaps, seemingly goes in reverse, and spirals. A doodle can seem out of control but, something special happens once the doodle is done, you see a magnificent pattern.

I created a design from the concept of my doodle drawings and called it, the doodle cross. The first design was commissioned for a priest who was getting ready to leave for Alaska. I am a bit of a collector of minerals and gems and I happened to have a nice slab of blue jade from Alaska.

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Natural Blue Jade from Alaska

The meaning behind the design: The doodle cross has significant meaning in the continuing walk with Christ. The cross is eclectic. There is silver and there is gold. There is a little sparkle of brightness here and there. Sometimes, it is bound because of the things that hold us back in life: fear, anger, pain, unforgiveness, jealousy, hate.

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Red Swarovski crystals and other crystal beads. Aluminum wire.

 

There are various red Swarovski crystals spread throughout. These crystals represent the blood of Christ. The Cross is a symbol used to meditate upon as a reminder of a sacrifice. It is not just about a sacrifice but, for those who believe, there is an ultimate success. In the midst of the unfolding of a plan, things seemed out of control. Complete chaos and struggle pursued and then, eventually, a death. Through the madness, sense of loss and despair, there was a light and the light meant hope. The doodle represents all the struggle and chaos but, also, a light of hope that all, in the end, is not lost. No, it is actually saved.

The Doodle represents a journey. It is sometimes smooth and happy. Sometimes extremely painful and lonely. Through it all, God is ever present. The Doodle Cross is a personal reminder that through the sunlight and clouds of our lives there is a Refiner and Purifier of silver at work; a Potter molding the clay.

 

 

The Turritella Agate Mishap

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This piece is listed in my Etsy store

Turritella Agate or Turritella Fossil is what this stone is usually called in the “market” and by “market” that means the jewelry makers and gem and mineral wholesalers. This name is actually incorrect. When it was initially discovered this material was thought to be the spiral-shaped gastropod (snail), turritella. What it really is is a freshwater snail called, Elimia tenera, which belongs to the Pleuroceridae family.  The photo below shows the actual turritella (fossil shells). Personally, I wouldn’t know the difference but, what makes it important is that elimia tenera is extinct. The turritella is still found along the coastline of beaches.

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Photo credit: By Wilson44691 – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5526735

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Photograph of a belt buckle made from chalcedony with fossilized Elimia tenera shells (formerly Goniobasis tenera and incorrectly Turritella) from the Eocene Green River Formation, Wyoming, USA. Belt buckle made and photograph taken by Thaddeus P. Bejnar, in the workshop of Waldemere Bejnar.

By Thaddeus P. Bejnar, Bejnar – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7003062